Henry More centenary conference

Henry More (1614-1687)
A Conference to Mark the Fourth Centenary of his Birth.
THE WARBURG INSTITUTE
5 DECEMBER 2014
Supported by the British Society for the History of Philosophy
Organisers Sarah Hutton and Guido Giglioni

Henry More was one of the most important thinkers in seventeenth-century British philosophy. Although he has never achieved the status of proper philosopher enjoyed by his contemporaries Hobbes and Locke, More’s work deserves to be recognized as a significant contribution to early modern philosophy. He was a figure who relentlessly engaged with the most pressing issues of his time. He intervened in the debate about the new science of nature and medicine, contributed in an original way to the recovery of Platonism and various elements of the classical tradition, left a lasting impact on the literary scene, and played a role in the contemporary religious controversies.
This conference will mark More’s centenary with reappraisal of his legacy.

Programme:
Jasper Reid: ‘More’s Place in Seventeenth-Century Thought’
Guido Giglioni: ‘Henry More’s Psychozoia and the Epic of Emanation’
Douglas Hedley: ‘Henry More and Nathaniel Ingelo: The Platonic Imagination in Cambridge?’
Cecilia Muratori, ‘Henry More on Animals’
Sarah Hutton: ‘Henry More and Renaissance Philosophy: More’s Response to Girolamo Cardano in his Of the Immortality of the Soul’
David Leech: ‘Henry More on the “Boniform Faculty”’
Alan Gabbey: ‘Philosophia Spinozana Destructa: Henry More (1671-1679)’

For booking information, visit

http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/colloquia-2014-15/henry-more/

Henry More’s ‘Enchiridion Ethicum’ (1668), September 12 and 13, Fribourg Switzerland

On September 12 and 13, 2014, the Philosophy Department at the University of Fribourg Switzerland will host a workshop on Henry More’s ‘Enchiridion Ethicum’ (1668). The workshop aims at exploring More’s rarely studied text by means of presentations and a roundtable discussion. Presentations will be in English and French.

Contributors:
Prof. Sarah Hutton, Aberystwyth University
Prof. Laurent Jaffro, Université Paris 1 Sorbonne-Panthéon
Dr. David Leech, University of Bristol
Dr. Christian Maurer, Université de Fribourg
Dr. Alain Petit, Université Blaise Pascal Clermont-Ferrand 2
Dr. John Sellars, Birkbeck College, University of London
Prof. Tiziana Suarez-Nani, Université de Fribourg

For further information, please visit the conference website (http://lettres.unifr.ch/fr/philosophie/philosophie/henry-more.html) or contact the organizer, Christian Maurer, Université de Fribourg (christian.maurer@unifr.ch). Attendance is free, but please inscribe via e-Mail.

‘Cambridge Platonists’ panel at International Society for Neoplatonic Studies 2014 Lisbon Conference

The 12th Annual Conference of the International Society for Neoplatonic Studies. Hosted and sponsored by the Philosophy Centre of the University of Lisbon, to be held at the Faculty of Letters of the University of Lisbon (Portugal) on June 16-21, 2014. This year includes a panel on ‘Cambridge Platonists’ (Douglas Hedley). For list of panels, follow this link.

Platonic Commentaries in the Renaissance

A conference on the contents and the role of the Platonic commentary tradition in the Renaissance.

Date: Weds 11th June 2014

Place: Birkbeck University of London

Organized by Stephen Clucas and John Sellars

Speakers: Michael Allen, Anna Corrias, Dilwyn Knox, Jacomien Prins, Valery Rees.

For more information see http://renaissance-philosophy.blogspot.co.uk/

 

The event is free and open to all.
To book a place please email either s.clucas@bbk.ac.uk or john.sellars@bbk.ac.uk

 

Cambridge Platonism on PhilPapers.org

There is an ever growing bibliography of philosophical papers and monographs on the Cambridge Platonists available at PhilPapers.org.

Cambridge Platonism [TextBibTeXEndNote]   

If you have bibliographies to add to this project you can do so directly on PhilPapers.org or send them to the category editor, Derek Michaud (Boston University & University of Southern Maine).

Henry More and Newton

Sarah Hutton will speak on ‘Henry More and the Cartesian context of Newton’s Early Cambridge Years’ at the conference ‘A great variety of admirable discoverys': Newton’s Principia in the Age of Enlightenment’ at the Royal Society, London, 11–13 December 2013.

For details visit http://royalsociety.org/events/2013/newtons-principia/

Autonomy and Human Dignity. Origen in Early Modern Philosophy

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Autonomy and Human Dignity. Origen in Early Modern Philosophy

            Edited by Alfons Fürst and Christian Hengstermann

            Münster 2012

 

Examining the thought of exemplary key philosophers of the era, the essay collection Autonomy and Human Dignity. Origen in early modern philosophy, the second volume of the Adamantiana series edited by the Origen Research Centre in Münster, traces the church father’s reception in European humanism in the 15th and 16th, in English Platonism in the 17th and in German Idealism in the 18th and 19th centuries. Origen’s concept of freedom is instrumental in shaping the modern notion of human autonomy and dignity. After the humanists Pico della Mirandola, John Colet and Erasmus of Rotterdam, it is the Cambridge Platonists who, following in their footsteps, take up Origenian theology to combat the nascent naturalism of early modern philosophers like Thomas Hobbes and Baruch de Spinoza. In a survey of the English Platonists’ appropriation of Origen in moral and religious philosophy, Ralph Cudworth, Henry More and Anne Conway are shown to reformulate key insights of the church father’s Platonism, including his anti-voluntarist notion of the Trinity, his doctrine of the soul’s pre-existence and his universal soteriology, in the light of the early modern debates on Arianism as well as determinism and naturalism. Not only did the Cambridge Platonists create a new theological paradigm based on Origen’s liberal Christian philosophy, but also paved the way for the historic religious philosophies of the Enlightenment and German Idealism.       

The Cambridge Origenists: George Rust’s Letter of Resolution Concerning Origen and the Chief of His Opinions

The Cambridge Origenists. George Rust’s Letter of Resolution Concerning Origen and the Chief of His Opinions

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Edited by Alfons Fürst and Christian Hengstermann

            Münster 2013

Not only are the years between 1658–1662 an era of important political change, but also “an Origenist moment in English theology” (Sarah Hutton). Besides a major edition of Origen’s highly influential Contra Celsum, Cambridge Platonism at that time produced entire religious philosophies informed by Origen’s metaphysical genius, culminating in the works of Henry More and his pupils at Christ’s College and Ragley Hall. Undoubtedly, the crowning achievement of Cambridge Origenism is the later bishop George Rust’s Letter of Resolution Concerning Origen and the Chief of His Opinions, which, published anonymously in 1661, sparked heated discussions on the soul’s pre-existence and fall and the restoration of all things at once. It offers both the first sustained defence of Origenism ever and a daring manifesto of the Cambridge Platonists’ liberal early modern moral and religious philosophy. To this end, Rust, engaging in a critical dialogue with the new philosophies of René Descartes and Thomas Hobbes and Calvinistic theology throughout, adopts basic insights of Origen’s theology, elaborating upon them in the light of the crucial controversies of his day. The fourth volume of the Adamantiana series gives a systematic reappraisal of Cambridge Origenism at large as well as an in-depth study of its key work, the anonymous Letter of Resolution. Its historical introduction and its six treatises on Origen’s “chief doctrines” are all analyzed in detail and with regard both to the use of sources and the systematic merit in the fields of ethics and metaphysics. Moreover, the volume includes a representative selection of key texts of the leading Cambridge Origenists Henry More, George Rust and Joseph Glanvill, which are given both in modernized spelling and with first German translations.    

session of the American Academy of Religion on ‘Cambridge Platonism Revisited’



On Monday 25th of November 4.00 pm-6.30pm 2013 there will be a session of the American Academy of Religion at Baltimore on 'Cambridge Platonism Revisited'. Speakers are Eric Parker (McGill) on Peter Sterry, Heather Ohanson (Columbia) on Cudworth and the Readmission of the Jews, Alex Hampton (Cambridge) on Herder and Cudworth. Douglas Hedley (Cambridge) will be presiding.

http://papers.aarweb.org/content/platonism-and-neoplatonism-group

Tercer Coloquio Internacional Presencia del platonismo y neoplatonismo en la Modernidad filosófica

An international conference on the presence of Platonism and Neoplatonism in Modern Philosophy

12-14 November 2013

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
Instituto de Investigaciones Filosóficas

The programme includes papers on Henry More, Anne Conway, Samuel Clarke and the Moral Philosophy of the Cambridge Platonists.

For more information visit

http://recursos.filosoficas.unam.mx/~jrg/iifs/sitio/filosoficas/3-coloquio-platonismo-y-neoplatonismo-modernidad-filosofica

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