Project Vox: Recovering Lost Voices of Women in Philosophy

A new project based at Duke University seeks to become the ‘virtual hub for an international network of scholars to work together in expanding our research and teaching beyond the traditional philosophical “canon” and beyond traditional narratives of modern philosophy’s history.’ Among the figures Project Vox seeks to recover are women associated with Cambridge Platonistism, Anne Conway and Damaris Cudworth Masham.

Project Vox has three central goals:

First, it seeks to provide students at all levels with the materials they need to begin exploring the rich philosophical ideas of Cavendish, Conway, Du Châtelet and Masham. Second, it aims to provide teachers with the material they need to incorporate these four figures into their courses. Third and finally, it aims to help transform our current conception of the canon.

The Project can be found online here: http://projectvox.library.duke.edu/pg/.

An informative article about the origins of the project can be found here: http://today.duke.edu/showcase/mmedia/features/finding-philosophys-female-voices/

Sympathy: Transformations and Functions between 1600 and 1800

This project, based at Humboldt University of Berlin, aims to chart the transformations of sympathy in seventeenth- and eighteenth-century English literature and culture, starting with its matrix patterns as formulated in classical antiquity. The project set out with a strong emphasis on Neoplatonism, addressing its various rephrasings and in particular its Early Modern interactions (including the Cambridge Platonists) with other philosophies and mentalities such as Epicureanism and Naturalism.  the interrelations between the competing world-views of Neoplatonism and Stoicism and their mutual modifications. In this process, sympathy emerges as a key concept. See attachment for further informations. SympathySFB-Logo

Science and Religion. An exhibition at Christ’s College Cambridge featuring Henry More.

The debate between science and religion is one of the most fascinating and enduring themes of the modern world.

In that debate – sometimes hostile, often harmonious, always complex – Christ’s College has played a significant role.

Whether one looks to the Neoplatonist thinker Henry More (1614-1687), or to William Paley (1743-1805) and his divine ‘watchmaker’, or to Charles Darwin (1809-1882) and his revolutionary theory of evolution, or to the theologian and naturalist Charles Raven (1885-1964), the relationship between scientific understanding and religious belief has exercised some of Christ’s College’s greatest minds.

In a new exhibition held in the stunning period setting of the Old Library, the crucial contribution that these men, and others, have made to this ongoing debate is explored via the College’s rich and diverse collections of printed books, manuscripts and photographs.
For more information visit
http://www.christs.cam.ac.uk/exhibitions/science-and-religion

The exhibition will be on display from 5 December 2014 until 29 May 2015.

Christ’s science and religion posterChrist’s science and religion poster

Henry More centenary conference

Henry More (1614-1687)
A Conference to Mark the Fourth Centenary of his Birth.
THE WARBURG INSTITUTE
5 DECEMBER 2014
Supported by the British Society for the History of Philosophy
Organisers Sarah Hutton and Guido Giglioni

Henry More was one of the most important thinkers in seventeenth-century British philosophy. Although he has never achieved the status of proper philosopher enjoyed by his contemporaries Hobbes and Locke, More’s work deserves to be recognized as a significant contribution to early modern philosophy. He was a figure who relentlessly engaged with the most pressing issues of his time. He intervened in the debate about the new science of nature and medicine, contributed in an original way to the recovery of Platonism and various elements of the classical tradition, left a lasting impact on the literary scene, and played a role in the contemporary religious controversies.
This conference will mark More’s centenary with reappraisal of his legacy.

Programme:
Jasper Reid: ‘More’s Place in Seventeenth-Century Thought’
Guido Giglioni: ‘Henry More’s Psychozoia and the Epic of Emanation’
Douglas Hedley: ‘Henry More and Nathaniel Ingelo: The Platonic Imagination in Cambridge?’
Cecilia Muratori, ‘Henry More on Animals’
Sarah Hutton: ‘Henry More and Renaissance Philosophy: More’s Response to Girolamo Cardano in his Of the Immortality of the Soul’
David Leech: ‘Henry More on the “Boniform Faculty”’
Alan Gabbey: ‘Philosophia Spinozana Destructa: Henry More (1671-1679)’

For booking information, visit
http://warburg.sas.ac.uk/events/colloquia-2014-15/henry-more/

Henry More’s ‘Enchiridion Ethicum’ (1668), September 12 and 13, Fribourg Switzerland

On September 12 and 13, 2014, the Philosophy Department at the University of Fribourg Switzerland will host a workshop on Henry More’s ‘Enchiridion Ethicum’ (1668). The workshop aims at exploring More’s rarely studied text by means of presentations and a roundtable discussion. Presentations will be in English and French.

Contributors:
Prof. Sarah Hutton, Aberystwyth University
Prof. Laurent Jaffro, Université Paris 1 Sorbonne-Panthéon
Dr. David Leech, University of Bristol
Dr. Christian Maurer, Université de Fribourg
Dr. Alain Petit, Université Blaise Pascal Clermont-Ferrand 2
Dr. John Sellars, Birkbeck College, University of London
Prof. Tiziana Suarez-Nani, Université de Fribourg

For further information, please visit the conference website (http://lettres.unifr.ch/fr/philosophie/philosophie/henry-more.html) or contact the organizer, Christian Maurer, Université de Fribourg (christian.maurer@unifr.ch). Attendance is free, but please inscribe via e-Mail.

‘Cambridge Platonists’ panel at International Society for Neoplatonic Studies 2014 Lisbon Conference

The 12th Annual Conference of the International Society for Neoplatonic Studies. Hosted and sponsored by the Philosophy Centre of the University of Lisbon, to be held at the Faculty of Letters of the University of Lisbon (Portugal) on June 16-21, 2014. This year includes a panel on ‘Cambridge Platonists’ (Douglas Hedley). For list of panels, follow this link.

Platonic Commentaries in the Renaissance

A conference on the contents and the role of the Platonic commentary tradition in the Renaissance.

Date: Weds 11th June 2014

Place: Birkbeck University of London

Organized by Stephen Clucas and John Sellars

Speakers: Michael Allen, Anna Corrias, Dilwyn Knox, Jacomien Prins, Valery Rees.

For more information see http://renaissance-philosophy.blogspot.co.uk/

 

The event is free and open to all.
To book a place please email either s.clucas@bbk.ac.uk or john.sellars@bbk.ac.uk

 

Cambridge Platonism on PhilPapers.org

There is an ever growing bibliography of philosophical papers and monographs on the Cambridge Platonists available at PhilPapers.org.

Cambridge Platonism [TextBibTeXEndNote]   

If you have bibliographies to add to this project you can do so directly on PhilPapers.org or send them to the category editor, Derek Michaud (Boston University & University of Southern Maine).

Henry More and Newton

Sarah Hutton will speak on ‘Henry More and the Cartesian context of Newton’s Early Cambridge Years’ at the conference ‘A great variety of admirable discoverys': Newton’s Principia in the Age of Enlightenment’ at the Royal Society, London, 11–13 December 2013.

For details visit http://royalsociety.org/events/2013/newtons-principia/

Autonomy and Human Dignity. Origen in Early Modern Philosophy

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Autonomy and Human Dignity. Origen in Early Modern Philosophy

            Edited by Alfons Fürst and Christian Hengstermann

            Münster 2012

 

Examining the thought of exemplary key philosophers of the era, the essay collection Autonomy and Human Dignity. Origen in early modern philosophy, the second volume of the Adamantiana series edited by the Origen Research Centre in Münster, traces the church father’s reception in European humanism in the 15th and 16th, in English Platonism in the 17th and in German Idealism in the 18th and 19th centuries. Origen’s concept of freedom is instrumental in shaping the modern notion of human autonomy and dignity. After the humanists Pico della Mirandola, John Colet and Erasmus of Rotterdam, it is the Cambridge Platonists who, following in their footsteps, take up Origenian theology to combat the nascent naturalism of early modern philosophers like Thomas Hobbes and Baruch de Spinoza. In a survey of the English Platonists’ appropriation of Origen in moral and religious philosophy, Ralph Cudworth, Henry More and Anne Conway are shown to reformulate key insights of the church father’s Platonism, including his anti-voluntarist notion of the Trinity, his doctrine of the soul’s pre-existence and his universal soteriology, in the light of the early modern debates on Arianism as well as determinism and naturalism. Not only did the Cambridge Platonists create a new theological paradigm based on Origen’s liberal Christian philosophy, but also paved the way for the historic religious philosophies of the Enlightenment and German Idealism.       

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